Bezkonechnyk: Trypillian Wave
2008

Date: July 21-25, 2008
Inspiration: Royal Ontario Museum’s 2008 major Exhibition “Ancient Ukraine:  Mysteries of the Trypillian Culture”, in partnership with the National Museum of History of Ukraine (Kyiv) and with collaboration of the Institute of Archeology in Ukraine
Highlights: Making Trypillian inspired pottery with the Gloucester Pottery School; pastel and charcoal story board illustrations; acrylic canvas painting inspired by a ‘horshyk’ (pot); a potter’s dance; girl ribbon dance; Trypillian imagined vocal gymnastics; Trypillian body art tattoos; beaded headbands and wrist bands from leather & metal beads; braided baked bread wreaths

Held from July 21-25, 2008 in Ottawa Canada, “Bezkonechnyk:  Trypillian Wave” was inspired by the 2008 Royal Ontario Museum “Ancient Ukraine:  Mysteries of the Trypillian Culture”, in partnership with the National Museum of History of Ukraine (Kyiv) and with collaboration of the Institute of Archeology in Ukraine.  An original Pokrova story unfolds in a Trypillian village with a young girl, Lada and her parents, and her potter uncle.  Bezkonechnyk (neverending) was a pattern used in Trypillian culture on pottery.  Lada watches and learns from her uncle as he makes his horshchyky (pots), sometimes dealing with the broken chards of Trypillian pottery that became buried in the land for centuries.

In 2008, Pokrova Camp reached into the millennia 4000 years ago to an ancient civilization living on the land of modern Ukraine.  Trypillians were an organized, cultured people whose architecture, artefacts, and approach to life left a lasting impact on Ukrainian culture.  From competing in Trypillian pop culture quiz, shaping and painting ceramic pots, imaging the geography and lifestyle in acrylic paints on canvas, beading and tattooing and braiding bread, children explored the Bezkonechny transporting Trypillian culture into the 21st century.

29 children from North America tattooed, played, painted, kneaded, built, sang and danced to celebrate what life would have been like in the ancient Ukrainian civilization of Trypillia.

For this special occasion, Pokrova Network commissioned unique works of textile and pysanka art from Ukraine which were featured at the Royal Ontario Museum’s Bookstore during the duration of the 2008 exhibit “Ancient Ukraine:  Mysteries of the Trypillian Culture”.

Pokrova Camp’s Honourary Patron was the Ambassador of Ukraine to Canada, Ihor Ostash.

Instructors